Roald Dahl’s books are some of the most beloved of all, with many millions of copies having been sold in dozens of editions around the world. Dahl had a way of capturing the imagination, anxieties, and jubilation of childhood such that even adult readers could feel themselves going back in time. While a sense of dread or even outright terror often ran through Dahl’s books, rescue and redemption were never far away. Even while many of Dahl’s villains succeeded too often for the comfort of some, most met their deserved fates before all was said and done.

That kind of literary magic is one that Broadway has been pursuing and exploring in earnest in recent years. With production costs rising steadily and the competition always fierce, Broadway investors have sought refuge in shows that leverage an existing success. It was therefore only a matter of time before one of Roald Dahl’s most beloved books of all found its way to one of the world’s most celebrated stages.

The arrival of the musical version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factor has been one of the most anticipated events in Braodway theatre of recent years. While some doubted that any production could ever match the magic either of the book itself or the Gene Wilder movie that remains so striking and distinctive, the Broadway version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has defied these doubts in splendid ways.

In fact, passes for the show have quickly become some of the most coveted Broadway theater Tickets of recent times. With reviewers and everyday audience members alike reporting that the show puts a fantastic new spin on a true classic, those who have yet to see it have often found themselves wishing to remedy that deficit as quickly as possible.

In fact, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has already become a leading contender for the title of the most successful show on Broadway of the year, even with many months and productions yet to come. With the show resonating especially well with the millions of tourists who help fill Broadway coffers every year, it also seems likely that Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will enjoy a great deal of success when it inevitably goes on the road. Whether it ends up being regarded as one of the best Broadway shows of the year in the end or not, the production is clearly doing no harm to the almost untouchable legacy that one of Roald Dahl’s best-loved books has been building for decades.